Australia & New Zealand Children’s History Reading Group

Following the success of the Society of the History of Childhood and Youth’s 11th Biennial Conference and the Children’s History Society UK’s ‘Speaking Up and Speaking Out’ Conference, Australian and New Zealand scholars working in the field of the history of children and youth are invited to join a new reading group.  The group will … More Australia & New Zealand Children’s History Reading Group

NZHA Conference – Extended Call for Papers & Reminder to Nominate for Prizes

Kia ora koutou, The NZHA Executive are continuing to plan for the Association’s 2021 Conference, and we hope to open the registration portal very soon. In the meantime, this is just a short notice detailing an extension to the paper submission deadline and a reminder that nominations for the 2021 NZHA Prizes need to be … More NZHA Conference – Extended Call for Papers & Reminder to Nominate for Prizes

Royal Society Expert Advisory Panel – Response to Draft Aotearoa NZ Histories Curriculum

Kia ora koutou The 31 May deadline for submissions on the draft Aotearoa New Zealand’s Histories Curriculum is fast approaching. The NZHA Executive encourage all our members to have their say on a document that will exert a significant and lasting influence on the future of history education in Aotearoa. Earlier this week, the Expert … More Royal Society Expert Advisory Panel – Response to Draft Aotearoa NZ Histories Curriculum

New DNZB biographies coming soon

From 2018, Manatū Taonga, Ministry for Culture and Heritage, will be publishing new biographies in the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. These will be included in modest annual batches. The first will celebrate the 125th anniversary of women’s suffrage. Read Tim Shoebridge’s blog about the news here.

Congratulations Katie Pickles, James Cook Research Fellowship

Congratulations to Professor Katie Pickles, NZHA Past President, for her recent success in winning the James Cook Research Fellowship, for her project “The Heroine with a thousand faces”. This is a wonderful coup for the Humanities, and more specifically New Zealand history, feminist scholarship, and women’s history. Read more about Katie’s fellowship here.